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If you're planning to take your dog from the United States to the European Union (EU), there are some important veterinary and government requirements to consider. These requirements are in place to ensure the health and safety of both animals and humans, and failure to comply could result in your pet being denied entry into the EU or even quarantined upon arrival.

First and foremost, your dog must be microchipped. This is a small implantable device that contains a unique identification number and is typically placed between the shoulder blades. The microchip must meet the ISO standards and be able to be read by a microchip reader that is compatible with the ISO standard. This ensures that your pet can be properly identified and tracked throughout its journey.

Next, your dog must be up-to-date on all their vaccinations, including rabies. The vaccination must have been administered at least 21 days before your pet's travel date. The vaccination certificate must be issued by a licensed veterinarian and should include the date of the vaccination, the expiration date, and the manufacturer and batch number of the vaccine. Make sure you keep a copy of this certificate with you at all times during your travels.

Additionally, your dog will need to have a health certificate issued by a licensed veterinarian within 10 days of travel. This certificate should include a statement that your pet is healthy and free from any contagious diseases, as well as their microchip number and vaccination information.

If you're traveling to the EU with your dog from the United States, your pet will need to arrive at one of the EU's designated entry points. These include airports and ports that have the necessary facilities to accommodate and inspect animals. You will also need to notify the relevant authorities in advance of your pet's arrival and provide them with all the necessary documentation.

It's important to note that different EU countries may have additional requirements, so it's important to check with the specific country you're traveling to well in advance of your trip. Some countries, for example, may require additional vaccinations or treatments for ticks and other parasites.

In summary, if you're planning to travel with your dog from the United States to the European Union, you will need to ensure that your pet is microchipped, up-to-date on all their vaccinations, and has a health certificate issued by a licensed veterinarian. You will also need to arrive at a designated entry point and notify the relevant authorities in advance. By taking the time to prepare and comply with these requirements, you can help ensure a safe and smooth journey for your furry companion.

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Olympia, WA 98506
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